Book Review: The Art of Work by Jeff Goins

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From the Book Description

The path to your life’s work is difficult and risky, even scary, which is why few finish the journey. This is a book about discovering your life’s work, that treasure of immeasurable worth we all long for. It’s about the task you were born to do.

As Jeff Goins explains, the search begins with passion but does not end there. Only when our interests connect with the needs of the world do we begin living for a larger purpose. Those who experience this intersection experience something exceptional and enviable. Though it is rare, such a life is attainable by anyone brave enough to try.

Through personal experience, compelling case studies, and current research on the mysteries of motivation and talent, Jeff shows readers how to find their vocation and what to expect along the way.

My Comments

I have been following Jeff Goins’ blog for a while now, so I was thrilled to have the chance to read and review his latest book, The Art of Work. Jeff Goins did not disappoint!

Goins’ writing is engaging, and insightful. The many personal stories sprinkled throughout the book (Goins’ and others) are inspiring and touching. At the same time, the book is challenging and encouraging. If you are struggling with finding your purpose in life, this book will guide your way in finding it.

And, if you already know your calling, read this book anyway. You will not be sorry. You will still find nuggets of wisdom, and inspiration, and your passion for your particular mission in life will be reignited in a big way.

I highly recommend that you get your hands on a copy of The Art of Work as soon as possible. 🙂 I give it five (5) stars.

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Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Book Review: A Mother’s Secret by Amy Clipston

A Mother's SecretFrom the Book Description

“Carolyn Lapp dreams of marrying for love. But will the errors of her past destroy this dream forever? Carolyn Lapp longs to have a traditional Amish family. But she lives on her brother’s farm with her parents and her 15-year old son, Benjamin. Carolyn has never revealed the identity of Benjamin’s father and lives daily with the guilt and shame of her youthful indiscretion. Her brother simply will not forgive her. His answer is to arrange a practical marriage for Carolyn to Saul, a widower with a little girl. But Carolyn isn’t convinced that Saul really loves her and believes he is simply looking for someone to help raise his daughter. When Benjamin causes trouble at a local horse auction, horse breeder Joshua Glick decides that he must be taught a lesson. Carolyn and Joshua are unmistakably drawn to each other, but Joshua mistakenly assumes that Benjamin is Carolyn’s brother. Carolyn fears that if he discovers the truth, her past will destroy their budding romance. After years of shame and loneliness, Carolyn suddenly has two men vying for her attention. But which of them will give her the family – and the unconditional love – she’s longed for?”

My Comments

Amy has done it again. Over and over Amy proves why she is one of my favorite love-inspired, Amish novelists, and A Mother’s Secret is no exception. I didn’t realize, when I chose this complimentary book to read and review through the Book Look Bloggers Review program, that it was the second of a series of books. It doesn’t matter though, this book is easily read on its own.

What I love about Amy’s writing is that she focuses on compelling themes, in this case forgiveness and restoration. She writes characters that are believable and likable, and in some cases, not so likable. 🙂 When I read her books, including this one, I am transported into another world, and yet, I can so easily relate to the struggles and joys experienced by the Amish characters. Who hasn’t made mistakes, been judged, and/or needed to forgive or be forgiven at some point in their life? Most of us have, Amish or not.

Amy also writes in a way that keeps me interested and turning the pages. As a matter of fact, I read this book in one sitting because I didn’t want to stop reading! It is an easy read, for sure, with a predictable ending, but that doesn’t take away the enjoyment of reading the book.

A Mother’s Secret is the perfect end-of-summer light read and I give it four (4) stars.