Assumption of the Blessed Mother

Today is the Solemnity of the Assumption of the Blessed Mother and it is a beautiful and important feast in our liturgical calendar. It is also a relatively new solemnity in that the Assumption of Mary was declared a dogma of the Church in 1950.

Assumption of Mary

Image by Peter Paul Rubens (1626) via Pixabay, CCO Public domain

What is the Assumption of Mary?

The Assumption of Mary is the event in which God to Mary to heaven – body and soul. When you and I die, our soul will go to heaven, purgatory or hell and our bodies will decay as it waits for the final Resurrection at the end of times. Mary, however, didn’t have to wait. Right now, Mary is in heaven with her soul and body already united.

Some theologians and thinkers believe that Mary was given the grace of not having to die and was assumed into heaven without dying first. Others believe that Mary did die, in imitation of Christ who died for us, but was assumed into heaven shortly after her death. Honestly, though, it doesn’t matter whether you believe Mary died before she was assumed or not. We are required to believe that Mary was, in fact, brought to heaven with her body and soul, not how it happened.

The Assumption is NOT the Ascension.

Many people get the Assumption of Mary and the Ascension of Jesus confused. That’s completely  understandable given that both feasts celebrate Jesus and Mary’s “entrance” into heaven body and soul. Here is the difference: In the Ascension of Jesus, 40 days after His Resurrection, Jesus ascends back to heaven through HIS OWN POWER. You can read about Jesus’ ascension at the end of the gospels in the bible. In the assumption, Mary is taken to heaven by POWER of GOD. Mary did NOT take herself to heaven, nor was she capable of doing so. The assumption is a gift and a grace of God that was granted to Mary.

Why was Mary Assumed into Heaven? 

During her life, Mary had a unique share in the suffering and death of Jesus. She carried him in her womb, she raised Him, and she followed Him in the most perfect way. Therefore, it seems fitting that she gets to have a unique share of His glory. 🙂

The significance of the Assumption.

This solemnity of the Assumption should give us great joy and hope. Mary is in heaven, in her glorified body just like we will be when the time comes. Thus, her Assumption is a peek of our future destiny. When we die, we know that our souls are separated from our bodies. But, this is temporary. When Jesus returns at the second coming, our souls and bodies will be reunited again in our own glorified bodies.

The Assumption reminds us that our life on earth isn’t all there is; we have a destiny. Jesus is our destiny. Heaven is real and it is our destiny. We live in hope that we will be with the Blessed Trinity, all the Saints and Angels in heaven, FOREVER. How awesome is that?!

How can we celebrate this special Solemnity?

1. The first thing you should do is go to Mass. As a matter of fact, the feast of the Assumption is a Holy Day of Obligation, so technically you “have” to go. Of course, we don’t celebrate the Eucharist just because we have to, right? We go to Mass because we want to. 😉

2. Pray the glorious mysteries of the rosary. The glorious mysteries include the Assumption of Mary. “Bonus points” if you pray as a family!

3. In times past, most parishes would have a procession in Our Lady’s honor on this day. It’s not that common anymore, however, your (or a  nearby) parish is doing a procession, consider participating in it. If there aren’t any local processions available, you can put do a small procession for yourself and your family.

4. If you have time, you can do some crafts with your kids like this one at crafolic.com or this one at catholicmom.com.

5. You can also make an Assumption themed meal or treat like I found here and here (scroll down to the Assumption) on catholiccuisine.com.

These are just a few ideas. I’m sure with a little thought you will be able to come up with your own way of honoring Our Lady. May your day be blessed!

Resources to deepen your understanding  of this great Solemnity:

New Advent

About.com

AssumptionMary.com

The Saints and Feasts in August 2015

August is upon us, so it is time for the monthly edition of “saints and feasts.” There are a lot of “good ones” this month with Saint Dominic, Saint Clare, The Transfiguration, The Assumption, and others!

SaintsandFeastAugust2015

Without further ado, here they are (don’t forget the printable at the end of post):

Saints and Feasts

August 1:  St Alphonsus, bishop & doctor of the church (obligatory memorial)

August 4: St. John Vianney, Priest (obligatory memorial)

August 5: Dedication of the Basilica of St. Mary Major (optional memorial)

August 6: The Transfiguration of the Lord (feast)

August 7: St. Sixtus II, Pope, and Companions, Martyrs (optional memorial)

August 7: St. Cajetan, Priest (optional memorial)

August 8: St. Dominic, Priest (obligatory memorial)

August 10: St. Lawrence, Deacon and Martyr (feast)

August 11: St. Clare, virgin (obligatory memorial)

August 12: St. Jane Frances de Chantal, religious (optional memorial)

August 13: Sts. Pontian, Pope, and Hippolytus, priest, martyrs (optional memorial)

August 14: St. Maximillian Kolbe, priest and martyr (obligatory memorial)

August 15: The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary (solemnity)

August 19: St. John Eudes, priest (optional memorial)

August 20: St. Bernard, abbot and doctor of the church (obligatory memorial)

August 21: St Pius X, pope (obligatory memorial)

August 22: The Queenship of the Blessed Virgin Mary (obligatory memorial)

August 24: St. Bartholomew, apostle (feast)

August 25: St. Louis or St. Joseph Calasanz, priest (optional memorial)

August 27: St. Monica (obligatory memorial)

August 28: St. Augustine, bishop and doctor of the church (obligatory memorial)

August 29: The Passion of St. John the Baptist (obligatory memorial)

August 30: St. Jeanne Jugan, religious (not celebrated this year because it falls on a Sunday, but she is one of my favorite saints, so I had to mention her!)

Other Dates to Note

Every Saturday is traditionally dedicated to devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary

August is traditionally dedicated to the Immaculate Heart of Mary and to the Blessed Sacrament

August 3: Civic Holiday (Canada)

 

The Assumption of Mary

Today is the Solemnity of the Assumption of Mary and it is a beautiful and important feast in our liturgical calendar. It is also relatively new in that the Assumption of Mary was declared a dogma of the Church in 1950.

What is the Assumption of Mary?Assumption of Mary

The Assumption of Mary is where God in His awesome mercy “assumed” Mary into heaven body and soul.

Some “camps” believe that Mary was given the grace of not having to die and was assumed without dying. Some “camps” believe that that in imitation of Christ that Mary did die but was assumed into heaven shortly after. According to my understanding, it doesn’t matter whether one believes Mary died or not first, what matters is the belief that Mary was brought to heaven and lives in heaven body and soul.

The Assumption is NOT the Ascension.

Some people get the Assumption of Mary and the Ascension of Jesus confused. That’s understandable given that both feasts celebrate Jesus and Mary’s “entrance” into heaven. Here is the difference: In the Ascension, 40 days after His Resurrection, Jesus ascends back to heaven through HIS OWN POWER. You can read about Jesus’ ascension at the end of the gospels. In the assumption, Mary is brought to heaven through the mercy and power of God. Mary did NOT take herself to heaven, nor is she capable of doing so. It is a gift and a grace that God has granted her.

And why not? From a human perspective, it seems only fair that since Mary had a share in Jesus’ suffering and death that get gets to have a share of His glory. 🙂

The significance of the Assumption.

This solemnity of the Assumption should give us great joy and hope. Mary is in heaven, body and soul, in her glorified body. Her Assumption is a peek into our future destiny. When we die, we know that souls are separated from our bodies. But, when Jesus returns again are souls and bodies will be reunited in our glorified bodies.

The Assumption reminds us that our life on earth isn’t all there is, we have a destiny. Jesus is our destiny. Heaven is real and is our destiny. One day we will be with the Blessed Trinity, all the Saints and Angels in heaven, FOREVER. How awesome is that?!

Resources to deepen your understanding  of this great Solemnity:

New Advent

About.com

AssumptionMary.com

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Sunday Snippets: A Catholic Carnival (August 18, 2013)

Sunday Snippets

Another week for Sunday Snippets. Come join us over atRAnn’s place and share your own posts from the week. Here’s mine:

Weekly Goals

An Open Invitation to Ministry (helping to spread Kathleen’s post)

Theological Thursday: The Assumption of Mary

Book Review: Letters to Katie by Kathleen Fuller

Question of the week:

RAnn is starting a new feature to Sunday Snippets. Each week she is going to post a question of the week for all the Sunday Snippets participants to answer (answering the question is completely optional). She is beginning the series of questions by asking everyone to introduce themselves.

I always feel funny introducing myself. I’m not a particularly exciting person or lead a very exciting life, but here goes. My name is Carol D’Annunzio. 🙂 On August 22 my husband and I will be married 10 years. We have one son, Andrew, whom we homeschool. He is eight years old. We currently live in NJ near the shore.

I am a “cradle-Catholic” but didn’t take my faith seriously until my late teen years. I spent nine years discerning a religious vocation with a group of sisters (the Little Sisters of the Poor). It was a wonderful experience and I am grateful for my time there even though it became clear I was called to marriage and family. Last summer I went back to college full time to finally finish my bachelor’s degree in English. I hope to finish by the spring 2015.

My hobbies include reading, writing, knitting, cooking, crafting and learning new things. I have a  good eye for detail and enjoy proofreading. I hope to offer proofreading services sometime in the future. I also have an Etsy Shop where I sell printables such as bookmarks, gift tags, etc.

As for blogging, I had a few different blogs over the years before beginning Simple Catholic Living in May 2010. What I love most about blogging is the many wonderful people I have had the opportunity to meet over the years, including everyone who links up at Sunday Snippets.

That’s about it. 🙂